Journal Article

Safety and Immunogenicity of an Inactivated Hepatitis A Vaccine among HIV-Infected Subjects

Mark R. Wallace, Carolyn J. Brandt, Kenneth C. Earhart, Barbara J. Kuter, Anthony D. Grosso, Hassan Lakkis and Sybil A. Tasker

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 39, issue 8, pages 1207-1213
Published in print October 2004 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online October 2004 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/424666
Safety and Immunogenicity of an Inactivated Hepatitis A Vaccine among HIV-Infected Subjects

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  • Public Health and Epidemiology
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Background. Hepatitis A is a major health risk for many human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals. Vaccination is a potentially attractive measure to reduce the incidence of hepatitis A among this population, but data on its safety and immunogenicity are incomplete.

Methods. Ninety HIV-uninfected adults received an inactivated hepatitis A vaccine (VAQTA; Merck), and 90 HIV-infected subjects were randomized, in double-blind fashion, to receive either the vaccine or placebo. The HIV-infected subjects were stratified by CD4 cell count, with 45 subjects having CD4 cell counts of ⩾300 cells/mm3 and 45 subjects having CD4 cell counts of <300 cells/mm3. Vaccine was given at weeks 0 and 24 of the study.

Results. Seroconversion rates at week 28 of the study were 94% among the HIV-infected subjects and 100% among the HIV-uninfected control subjects. HIV-infected subjects with CD4 cell counts of <300 cells/mm3 had a seroconversion rate of 87%, and HIV-infected subjects with CD4 cell counts of ⩾300 cells/mm3 had a seroconversion rate of 100%. The vaccine was generally well tolerated, and no adverse effect on either HIV load or CD4 cell count was found.

Conclusion. Hepatitis A vaccine was both immunogenic and safe among HIV-infected subjects.

Journal Article.  3951 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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