Journal Article

The Clinical Impact of Ganciclovir Prophylaxis on the Occurrence of Bacteremia in Orthotopic Liver Transplant Recipients

L. Silvia Munoz-Price, Michelle Slifkin, Robin Ruthazer, Debra D. Poutsiaka, Susan Hadley, Richard Freeman, Richard Rohrer, Michael Angelis, Jeffrey Cooper, Ralph Fairchild, Laurie Barefoot, Judy Bloom, Susan Fitzmaurice and David R. Snydman

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 39, issue 9, pages 1293-1299
Published in print November 2004 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online November 2004 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/425002
The Clinical Impact of Ganciclovir Prophylaxis on the Occurrence of Bacteremia in Orthotopic Liver Transplant Recipients

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Background. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection or receipt of a CMV-seropositive donor liver has been shown to be an independent predictor of bacteremia in orthotopic liver transplant (OLT) recipients. However, prevention of CMV infection through use of intense CMV prophylaxis has not been examined to assess the impact on bacteremia in liver transplant recipients.

Methods. We analyzed the impact of CMV prophylaxis on rates of bacteremia by examining 192 consecutive OLT recipients during a 2-year follow-up period.

Results. There were 29 episodes of bacteremia. Univariate analysis of risk factors for bacteremia showed that invasive fungal disease, initial anti-lymphocyte immunosuppression, treatment for rejection, and use of solumedrol were significantly associated with increased risk. Receipt of ⩾14 days of ganciclovir prophylaxis (hazard ratio [HR], 0.40; 95% CI [confidence interval], 0.18–0.87; P = .02), end-to-end biliary anastomosis, and receipt of <10 units of red blood cells (RBCs) were significantly associated with a decreased risk. Three-variable analysis controlling for end-to-end anastomosis and use of <10 units of RBCs, showed that use of ⩾14 days of ganciclovir was still associated with a reduced risk of bacteremia (HR, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.20–0.98; P = .0437).

Conclusions. Among factors associated with bacteremia, use of prophylactic ganciclovir is independently associated with a significant reduction of bacteremia in OLT recipients.

Journal Article.  3521 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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