Journal Article

Longitudinal Risk of Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) Type 1, HSV Type 2, and Cytomegalovirus Infections among Young Adolescent Girls

Lawrence R. Stanberry, Susan L. Rosenthal, Lisa Mills, Paul A. Succop, Frank M. Biro, Rhoda Ashley Morrow and David I. Bernstein

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 39, issue 10, pages 1433-1438
Published in print November 2004 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online November 2004 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/425307
Longitudinal Risk of Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) Type 1, HSV Type 2, and Cytomegalovirus Infections among Young Adolescent Girls

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Background. Cross-sectional seroprevalence studies indicate that infections with herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 (HSV-1) and 2 (HSV-2) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) are common. However, data on the rates of acquisition of these infections are limited.

Methods. A 3-year longitudinal study of HSV-1, HSV-2, and CMV seroprevalence was conducted in a cohort of 174 adolescent girls (age at enrollment, 12–15 years).

Results. At study entry, 41% of the girls reported a history of sexual activity, and by the end of the study, 73% reported a history of sexual activity. At enrollment, 71% of all participants were seropositive for CMV, 44% were seropositive for HSV-1, and 7% were seropositive for HSV-2. By the end of the study, 81% of the girls were seropositive for CMV, 49% were seropositive for HSV-1, and 14% were seropositive for HSV-2. Among girls with a history of sexual activity, 15.5% were HSV-2 seropositive at the beginning of the study, and 18.9% were HSV-2 seropositive at the end of the study. The attack rates, based on the number of cases per 100 person-years, were 13.8 for CMV infection and 3.2 for HSV-1 infection (among all girls) and 4.4 for HSV-2 infection (among girls with a history of sexual activity). Participants with preexisting HSV-1 antibodies were associated with a significantly lower attack rate for HSV-2 infection. A generalized estimating equation model indicated that participants with a longer history of sexual activity and those who had more sexually transmitted diseases during the 6-month periods before the study visits were more likely to be HSV-2 seropositive.

Conclusions. This longitudinal study of adolescent girls found high baseline CMV and HSV-1 seroprevalence rates and substantial attack rates for all 3 pathogens.

Journal Article.  3821 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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