Journal Article

Challenges in the Treatment of Infections Caused by Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria in Patients with Cancer and Neutropenia

Kenneth V. I. Rolston

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 40, issue Supplement_4, pages S246-S252
Published in print April 2005 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online April 2005 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/427331
Challenges in the Treatment of Infections Caused by Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria in Patients with Cancer and Neutropenia

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Infection is the most common complication of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. Bacterial infections predominate during the early stages of a neutropenic episode, whereas invasive fungal infections tend to occur later. The epidemiological pattern of bacterial infection continues to evolve globally and locally at the institutional level, as do patterns of susceptibility and resistance. These trends are often associated with local treatment practices and have a significant effect on the nature of empirical antibiotic therapy. The increasing rates of antimicrobial resistance among both gram-positive and gram-negative pathogens isolated from patients with neutropenia are posing new challenges. These challenges are compounded by the fact that relatively few new drugs are being developed, particularly those that treat resistant gram-negative organisms. They also stress the increasing importance of prevention and control of infection and stewardship of antibiotics as strategies in the overall treatment of patients with febrile neutropenia. The recognition of a subset of low-risk patients with neutropenia has created new opportunities (e.g., outpatient and oral therapy) and new challenges (e.g., infrastructure, safety, and compliance). These challenges may be met, to some extent, by appropriately adapting national guidelines to local and institutional circumstances.

Journal Article.  4660 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.