Journal Article

Concurrent Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) in Sex Partners of Patients with Selected STIs: Implications for Patient-Delivered Partner Therapy

Joanne Stekler, Laura Bachmann, Rebecca M. Brotman, Emily J. Erbelding, Laura V. Lloyd, Cornelis A. Rietmeijer, H. Hunter Handsfield, King K. Holmes and Matthew R. Golden

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 40, issue 6, pages 787-793
Published in print March 2005 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online March 2005 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/428043
Concurrent Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) in Sex Partners of Patients with Selected STIs: Implications for Patient-Delivered Partner Therapy

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Background. Patient-delivered partner therapy (PDPT) is the practice of providing disease-specific antimicrobial agents to patients for delivery to their sex partners. Some partners who receive PDPT may forgo clinical evaluation, resulting in missed opportunities for the diagnosis and treatment of comorbid conditions.

Methods. We conducted a review of electronic charts for 8623 individuals attending 4 sexually transmitted disease clinics who were sex partners of patients with selected sexually transmitted infections (STIs). We evaluated the concordance between STIs diagnosed in partners and their reported exposures for which they might have received PDPT.

Results. Among 3503 female and 4647 heterosexual male partners, 19 (0.4%) of 4716 individuals tested were newly diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, and 61 individuals (0.7%) had syphilis. Pelvic inflammatory disease was diagnosed in 133 women (3.8%). Seventy-two (3.2%) of 2226 female and heterosexual male partners reporting exposure to patients with chlamydial infection had gonorrhea diagnosed. Chlamydial infection or gonorrhea was diagnosed in 81 heterosexual male partners (10.3%) who reported contact with women with trichomoniasis. Among 473 men who have sex with men (MSM; including bisexual men), 13 (6.3%) of 207 tested were newly diagnosed with HIV infection, and 8 (1.7%) had syphilis. Six (6.1%) of 98 MSM reporting exposure to patients with chlamydial infection had gonorrhea diagnosed.

Conclusions. Infrequent coinfections in female and heterosexual male partners exposed to patients with chlamydial infection or gonorrhea would not preclude use of PDPT. However, PDPT for male partners of women with trichomoniasis and for MSM requires further study.

Journal Article.  3795 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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