Journal Article

Pharmacoeconomic Considerations Associated with the Use of Intravenous-to-Oral Moxifloxacin for Community-Acquired Pneumonia

Susan L. Davis, George Delgado and Peggy S. McKinnon

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 41, issue Supplement_2, pages S136-S143
Published in print July 2005 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online July 2005 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/428054
Pharmacoeconomic Considerations Associated with the Use of Intravenous-to-Oral Moxifloxacin for Community-Acquired Pneumonia

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Background. Intravenous-to-oral (iv/po) conversion is one cost-effective approach to the management of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP).

Methods. Consecutive patients with CAP were enrolled during 3 study periods (January–March of 2001, 2002, and 2004) with different pharmacy intervention (PI) strategies: iv β-lactam plus a macrolide (no PI), iv β-lactam plus a macrolide with iv/po PI (PI switch), and iv moxifloxacin with pharmacist-initiated automatic po moxifloxacin conversion (PI sequential). Costs and outcomes were compared among groups.

Results. Two hundred fifty-one patients were enrolled. The average Fine score was 75, and the mean age of patients was 51 years. In the PI groups, the duration of treatment with iv antibiotics was decreased. Clinical success on day 3 of therapy was improved in the PI sequential group but was similar in all 3 groups on day 7 of therapy and at the end of therapy. The length of stay in the hospital was similar for patients in all 3 groups (mean, 4.39 days). Antibiotic costs were significantly reduced, by $110/patient, in the PI sequential group.

Conclusions. Conversion from iv to po therapy was accomplished more quickly when converting to the same agent with pharmacist-initiated automatic iv/po conversion, thus reducing the associated cost without compromising efficacy.

Journal Article.  4990 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.