Journal Article

Invasive Infection with Multidrug-Resistant <i>Salmonella enterica</i> Serotype Typhimurium Definitive Type 104 among HIV-Infected Adults

Tamara L. Fisk, Brita E. Lundberg, Jodie L. Guest, Susan Ray, Timothy J. Barrett, Ben Holland, Karen Stamey, Frederick J. Angulo and Monica M. Farley

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 40, issue 7, pages 1016-1021
Published in print April 2005 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online April 2005 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/428119
Invasive Infection with Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhimurium Definitive Type 104 among HIV-Infected Adults

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Background. Multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium definitive type 104 (MRDT104), with resistance to at least ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, and tetracycline (R-type ACSSuT), was first detected in the United States in 1985 [1], and the prevalence increased to account for nearly 7% of Salmonella infections in 1998 [2].

Methods. A retrospective study of S. Typhimurium infections in an urban health care system assessed whether infection with an antibiotic-resistant strain—and specifically MRDT104—was associated with invasive disease or HIV infection. Sixty cases of S. Typhimurium infection were identified.

Results. Of the 50 isolates available for analysis, 30 (60%) were MRDT104. Pathogens were isolated from blood in 25 (83%) of 30 patients infected with MRDT104, compared with 10 (50%) of 20 patients who were infected with non-MRDT104 strains (P = .01). Among isolates obtained from 32 HIV-infected patients, 19 (95%) of 20 MRDT104 isolates were from blood specimens, compared with 8 (66%) of 12 non-MRDT104 isolates (P = .05).

Conclusions. MRDT104 accounted for the majority of S. Typhimurium infections in this patient population, and MRDT104 infections were more invasive than non-MRDT104 infections, particularly in HIV-infected persons.

Journal Article.  4151 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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