Journal Article

Analysis of Chemokine and Cytokine Expression in Patients with HIV and GB Virus Type C Coinfection

Mireia Giménez-Barcons, Meritxell Ribera, Anuska Llano, Bonaventura Clotet, Jose A. Esté and Miguel A. Martínez

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 40, issue 9, pages 1342-1349
Published in print May 2005 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online May 2005 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/429320
Analysis of Chemokine and Cytokine Expression in Patients with HIV and GB Virus Type C Coinfection

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Background. Plasma levels of several chemokines and cytokines were evaluated in a cohort of 161 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients to shed light on a clinically relevant mechanism that would explain the putative beneficial effect of GB virus type C (GBV-C) coinfection.

Methods. Markers for GBV-C infection were assessed in plasma samples. The syncitium-inducing (SI) capacity of isolated virus from each patient was determined in MT-2 cells. Plasma cytokine and chemokine levels were quantified with use of a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

Results. GBV-C viremia was found in 44 (27%) of 161 patients, and anti-E2 antibodies were found in 18 (21%) of 87. In contrast to the findings of ex vivo analysis, no statistically significant differences were observed in levels of CCL5, stromal cell-derived factor 1, interleukin-7, and tumor necrosis factor-α in plasma of patients with or without GBV-C viremia. Seventy-two (45%) and 89 (55%) of our patients harbored SI and non-SI (NSI) strains, respectively. GBV-C viremia was less prevalent among patients with SI strains (13 [18%] of 72) than among patients with NSI strains (30 [34%] of 89; P = .6). of interest, coinfected patients with SI strains had significantly higher CD4+ T cell values than did patients who were not coinfected.

Conclusions. Our results suggest that GBV-C infection does not appear to influence the expression of the cytokines and chemokines analyzed herein in a clinically relevant context. Alternative explanations for the elevated levels of HIV-inhibitory chemokines are needed to explain the putative beneficial effect of GBV-C.

Journal Article.  4222 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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