Journal Article

Tumor Necrosis Factor and Chemokine Interactions in the Formation and Maintenance of Granulomas in Tuberculosis

Holly M. Scott Algood, Philana Ling Lin and JoAnne L. Flynn

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 41, issue Supplement_3, pages S189-S193
Published in print August 2005 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online August 2005 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/429994
Tumor Necrosis Factor and Chemokine Interactions in the Formation and Maintenance of Granulomas in Tuberculosis

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Inflammatory cells migrate to the lungs in response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. These infiltrating cells organize into a structure called a granuloma, which controls and contains infection. The signals that influence the formation of granulomas are largely unknown. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has been demonstrated to be required for formation of granulomas, in mouse models of tuberculosis, and for control of latent tuberculosis, in humans. We investigated the mechanisms by which TNF controls cell migration in response to M. tuberculosis infection, focusing on the effects of this cytokine on chemokine expression. Chemokines are small molecules that direct the migration of cells within the body. Our data support the notion that TNF is required for appropriate chemokine expression by M. tuberculosis—infected macrophages, both in vitro and in vivo.

Journal Article.  2884 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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