Journal Article

The Global Status of Resistance to Antiretroviral Drugs

Stefano Vella and Lucia Palmisano

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 41, issue Supplement_4, pages S239-S246
Published in print August 2005 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online August 2005 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/430784
The Global Status of Resistance to Antiretroviral Drugs

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Since 1989, the emergence of resistant human immunodeficiency virus mutants has been documented for any new antiretroviral agent introduced in the clinical setting; it is a major cause of failure of antiretroviral therapy that may ultimately compromise the antiretroviral's efficacy in the general population. In most cases, resistance is due to poor adherence by the patient and/or to low potency of the therapeutic regimen. Resistance is called “primary” if detected in treatment-naive persons and is called “acquired” when it develops in treatment-experienced persons. This latter population represents potential transmitters of resistant viruses to newly infected persons. Data about the actual prevalence of resistance are derived from studies that differ in design, sample size, geographic area, and definitions. For this reason, a limited number of surveillance programs have been established in the past, both in countries where highly active antiretroviral therapy is widely accessible and in geographic areas where it is being introduced.

Journal Article.  4562 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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