Journal Article

<i>Staphylococcus aureus</i> Native Valve Infective Endocarditis: Report of 566 Episodes from the International Collaboration on Endocarditis Merged Database

Josù M. Miro, Ignasi Anguera, Christopher H. Cabell, Anita Y. Chen, Judith A. Stafford, G. Ralph Corey, Lars Olaison, Susannah Eykyn, Bruno Hoen, Elias Abrutyn, Didier Raoult, Arnold Bayer and Vance G. Fowler

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 41, issue 4, pages 507-514
Published in print August 2005 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online August 2005 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1086/431979
Staphylococcus aureus Native Valve Infective Endocarditis: Report of 566 Episodes from the International Collaboration on Endocarditis Merged Database

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Background. Staphylococcus aureus native valve infective endocarditis (SA-NVIE) is not completely understood. The objective of this investigation was to describe the characteristics of a large, international cohort of patients with SA-NVIE.

Methods. The International Collaboration on Endocarditis Merged Database (ICE-MD) is a combination of 7 existing electronic databases from 5 countries that contains data on 2212 cases of definite infective endocarditis (IE).

Results. Of patients with native valve IE, 566 patients (34%) had IE due to S. aureus, and 1074 patients had IE due to pathogens other than S. aureus (non–SA-NVIE). Patients with S. aureus IE were more likely to die (20% vs. 12%; P < .001), to experience an embolic event (60% vs. 31%; P < .001), or to have a central nervous system event (20% vs. 13%; P < .001) and were less likely to undergo surgery (26% vs. 39%; P < .001) than were patients with non–SA-NVIE. Multivariate analysis of prognostic factors of mortality identified age (odds ratio [OR], 1.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1–1.7), periannular abscess (OR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.1–5.6), heart failure (OR, 3.9; 95% CI, 2.3–6.7), and absence of surgical therapy (OR, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.3–4.2) as variables that were independently associated with mortality in patients with SA-NVIE. After adjusting for patient-, pathogen-, and treatment-specific characteristics by multivariate analysis, geographical region was also found to be associated with mortality in patients with SA-NVIE (P < .001).

Conclusions. S. aureus is an important and common cause of IE. The outcome of SA-NVIE is worse than that of non–SA-NVIE. Several clinical parameters are independently associated with mortality for patients with SA-NVIE. The clinical characteristics and outcome of SA-NVIE vary significantly by geographic region, although the reasons for such regional variations in outcomes of SA-NVIE are unknown and are probably multifactorial. A large, prospective, multinational cohort study of patients with IE is now under way to further investigate these observations.

Journal Article.  3684 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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