Journal Article

The Role of the Mannose-Binding Lectin in Innate Immunity

Kazue Takahashi and R. Alan B. Ezekowitz

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 41, issue Supplement_7, pages S440-S444
Published in print November 2005 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online November 2005 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1086/431987
The Role of the Mannose-Binding Lectin in Innate Immunity

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The innate immune system, which includes mannose-binding lectin (MBL), recognizes a broad range of molecular patterns on a broad range of infectious agents and is able to distinguish them from self. MBL is a liver-derived serum protein and is secreted into the serum, where it can activate an immune response before the induction of antigen-specific immunity. Circumstantial evidence in human populations suggests that low serum levels of MBL predispose to infection. To analyze the role of MBL in vivo, we created MBL-null mice and challenged these mice with infection under various conditions. Our results suggest that MBL plays an important role as a first-line host defense against certain infectious agents. In addition, it is likely that MBL is a key regulator of inflammation beyond expected roles in the infection.

Journal Article.  3422 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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