Journal Article

Cytokine Promoter Polymorphisms in Severe Sepsis

Frank Stüber, Sven Klaschik, Lutz Eric Lehmann, Jens-Christian Schewe, Stefan Weber and Malte Book

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 41, issue Supplement_7, pages S416-S420
Published in print November 2005 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online November 2005 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/431991
Cytokine Promoter Polymorphisms in Severe Sepsis

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The need to develop individualized risk profiles and drug therapy regimens motivates interest in genetic studies of critically ill patients. Gene promoter variants may predict interindividual variability in response to inflammatory stimuli, such as infection and trauma. Genomic variations also may affect gene expression profiles, as well as the structure and production of proteins. The genes involved in inflammation are numerous, as are genomic variations within most of those genes. Cytokine genes involved in inflammatory cascades are important candidate genes that may determine the extent of a person's response to injury. Understanding the genetic determination of the inflammatory process includes the possibility of developing valuable diagnostic tools and new therapeutic approaches in severe sepsis. To date, specific patterns of markers of genomic variation reliably indicating at-risk populations do not exist. Evaluation of possible genomic markers for risk stratification of patients with sepsis and persons at high risk of developing organ failure has begun at a level of well-powered genetic epidemiological research. Cytokine promoter variants may contribute substantially to studies of genetic predisposition of sepsis because they operate in a gene region of high regulatory activity.

Journal Article.  2808 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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