Journal Article

Triglyceride-Rich Lipoproteins as Agents of Innate Immunity

Anthony M. Barcia and Hobart W. Harris

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 41, issue Supplement_7, pages S498-S503
Published in print November 2005 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online November 2005 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/432005
Triglyceride-Rich Lipoproteins as Agents of Innate Immunity

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Bacterial endotoxin (i.e., lipopolysaccharide [LPS]) elicits dramatic responses in the host, including elevated plasma lipid levels due to increased synthesis and secretion of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins by the liver and inhibition of lipoprotein lipase. This cytokine-induced hyperlipoproteinemia, clinically termed the “lipemia of sepsis,” was customarily thought to involve the mobilization of lipid stores to fuel the host response to infection. However, because lipoproteins can also bind and neutralize LPS, we have long postulated that triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (very-low-density lipoproteins and chylomicrons) are also components of an innate, nonadaptive host immune response to infection. Recent research demonstrates the capacity of lipoproteins to bind LPS, protect against LPS-induced toxicity, and modulate the overall host response to this bacterial toxin.

Journal Article.  4502 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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