Journal Article

Hepatitis C Virus Infection in HIV Type 1—Infected Individuals Does Not Accelerate a Decrease in the CD4<sup>+</sup> Cell Count but Does Increase the Likelihood of AIDS-Defining Events

Justin Stebbing, Laura Waters, Sundhiya Mandalia, Mark Bower, Mark Nelson and Brian Gazzard

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 41, issue 6, pages 906-911
Published in print September 2005 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online September 2005 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/432885
Hepatitis C Virus Infection in HIV Type 1—Infected Individuals Does Not Accelerate a Decrease in the CD4+ Cell Count but Does Increase the Likelihood of AIDS-Defining Events

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Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) appears to adversely affect hepatitis C, but whether hepatitis C virus (HCV) has a reciprocal effect on HIV-1 infection remains a point of controversy. In a multivariate analysis of a cohort of 5832 individuals, we found that individuals coinfected with HCV and HIV-1 (prevalence of coinfection, 5.8%) had a CD4+ cell count that decreased at a rate similar to that for individuals infected with HIV-1 alone. However, coinfection was associated with a statistically significant increased likelihood of onset of an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome—defining illness or developing a CD4+ cell count of <200 cells/mm3, compared with infection with HIV-1 alone (hazard ratio, 1.52; 95% confidence interval, 1.07–2.17). Patients who were naive to highly active antiretroviral therapy were significantly less likely to progress to either end point, because of their higher CD4+ cell counts. In conclusion, there was an increased number of adverse events in coinfected individuals, compared with individuals infected with HIV-1 alone.

Journal Article.  3123 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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