Journal Article

Buprenorphine: Its Role in Preventing HIV Transmission and Improving the Care of HIV-Infected Patients with Opioid Dependence

Lynn E. Sullivan and David A. Fiellin

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 41, issue 6, pages 891-896
Published in print September 2005 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online September 2005 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/432888
Buprenorphine: Its Role in Preventing HIV Transmission and Improving the Care of HIV-Infected Patients with Opioid Dependence

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In the United States, ∼25% of the 40,000 new human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections each year are secondary to injection drug use. Worldwide, there are an estimated 12.6 million injection drug users, and 10% of HIV infections (420,000 infections in 2003) are associated with this practice. Buprenorphine is a new medication used to treat opioid dependence that shows promise for reducing the rate of HIV transmission and improving the care of opioid-dependent patients with HIV infection. Although buprenorphine faces fewer clinical and regulatory barriers than does methadone, the optimal strategy for integration of office-based treatment of opioid dependence and HIV disease is an area of ongoing research. This review addresses the introduction of buprenorphine, in terms of public health, policy, and clinical implications for HIV-infected patients and for HIV care providers.

Journal Article.  5074 words. 

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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