Journal Article

Validation and Clinical Application of Molecular Methods for the Identification of Molds in Tissue

P. J. Paterson, S. Seaton, T. D. McHugh, J. McHugh, M. Potter, H. G. Prentice and C. C. Kibbler

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 42, issue 1, pages 51-56
Published in print January 2006 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online January 2006 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/498111
Validation and Clinical Application of Molecular Methods for the Identification of Molds in Tissue

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Background. Invasive fungal infections due to less-common molds are an increasing problem, and accurate diagnosis is difficult.

Methods. We used our previously established molecular method, which allows species identification of molds in histological tissue sections, to test sequential specimens from 56 patients with invasive fungal infections who were treated at our institution from 1982 to 2000.

Results. The validity of the method was demonstrated with the establishment of a molecular diagnosis in 52 cases (93%). Confirmation of the causative organism was made in all cases in which a mold had been cultured from the tissue specimen. Less-common molds were identified in 7% of cases and appear to be an increasing problem.

Conclusions. Our previously established method has proven to be of value in determining the incidence of invasive infection caused by less-common molds. Institutions should continue to pursue diagnosis of invasive fungal infections by means of tissue culture and microbiologic analysis.

Journal Article.  2473 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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