Journal Article

Physicians' Acceptable Treatment Failure Rates in Antibiotic Therapy for Coagulase-Negative Staphylococcal Catheter-Associated Bacteremia: Implications for Reducing Treatment Duration

Eli N. Perencevich, Anthony D. Harris, Keith S. Kaye, Douglas D. Bradham, David N. Fisman, Laura A. Liedtke and Larry J. Strausbaugh

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 41, issue 12, pages 1734-1741
Published in print December 2005 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online December 2005 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/498116
Physicians' Acceptable Treatment Failure Rates in Antibiotic Therapy for Coagulase-Negative Staphylococcal Catheter-Associated Bacteremia: Implications for Reducing Treatment Duration

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Background. Decreasing the duration of antimicrobial therapy is an attractive strategy for delaying the emergence of antimicrobial resistance. Limited data regarding optimal treatment durations for most clinical infections hinder the adoption of this approach and impair optimal physician-patient communication under the shared decision-making model. We aimed to identify acceptable failure rates among infectious disease consultants (IDCs) for treatment of central venous catheter—associated bacteremia.

Methods. A case scenario involving a representative patient who developed central venous catheter—associated bacteremia caused by coagulase-negative staphylococci and who received standard-of-care therapy was distributed to all nonpediatric IDC members of the Infectious Diseases Society of America's Emerging Infections Network in August 2003. Each member was suggested 1 of 10 treatment failure rates and asked whether he or she would accept or reject the given value. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the relationship between specific failure rates offered to respondents and their willingness to accept them using a methodology derived from contingent valuation.

Results. Among the 374 respondents (response rate, 54%), the median acceptable failure rate was 6.8%. Thus, one-half of the IDCs would have found a failure rate of 6.8% to be acceptable. Seventy-five percent of IDCs would have found a failure rate of 1.6% to be acceptable, and 25% of IDCs would have found a failure rate as high as 11.9% to be acceptable.

Conclusions. The quantified acceptable failure rates, when used to interpret clinical trial or cohort study results, will help select optimal antimicrobial therapy durations for this specific condition. These findings are a critical step in the development of effective shared decision-making models.

Journal Article.  4394 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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