Journal Article

Nontyphoidal Salmonella from Human Clinical Cases, Asymptomatic Children, and Raw Retail Meats in Yucatan, Mexico

Mussaret B. Zaidi, Patrick F. McDermott, Paula Fedorka-Cray, Verónica Leon, Claudia Canche, Susannah K. Hubert, Jason Abbott, Magda León, Shaohua Zhao, Marcia Headrick and Linda Tollefson

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 42, issue 1, pages 21-28
Published in print January 2006 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online January 2006 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/498508
Nontyphoidal Salmonella from Human Clinical Cases, Asymptomatic Children, and Raw Retail Meats in Yucatan, Mexico

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Background. We report the results of a 3-year Salmonella surveillance study of persons with diarrhea; asymptomatic children; and retail pork, poultry, and beef in Yucatan, Mexico.

Methods. Isolates were characterized according to serotype, antimicrobial susceptibility, and genetic relatedness with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

Results. Salmonella Typhimurium was the most common serotype found in ill humans (21.8% of isolates), followed by Salmonella Agona (21% of isolates). Salmonella Enteritidis was a minor serotype (4.2% of isolates). Asymptomatic children carried S. Agona (12.1% of isolates), Salmonella Meleagridis (11.6% of isolates), Salmonella Anatum (8% of isolates) and S. Enteritidis (5.8% of isolates). A high percentage of retail meat samples contained Salmonella; it was most commonly found in pork (58.1% of samples), followed by beef (54% of samples) and poultry (39.7% of samples). Resistance to oral drugs used for the treatment of salmonellosis was observed for ampicillin (14.6% of isolates were resistant), chloramphenicol (14.0% of isolates), and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (19.7% of isolates). Resistance to ceftriaxone emerged in 2002 and was limited to the serotype S. Typhimurium. Twenty-seven percent of the isolates were resistant to nalidixic acid, and none were resistant to ciprofloxacin. Multidrug resistance was most common among isolates of serotypes S. Typhimurium and S. Anatum. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed that strains found in retail meats were genetically identical to strains found in both asymptomatic children and ill patients.

Conclusions. Our study found a high prevalence of Salmonella in retail meats and persons with enteric infection; many of these isolates were resistant to clinically important antimicrobials. A random selection of isolates from people and retail meat showed genetic relatedness, which suggests that, in Yucatan, considerable transfer of Salmonella occurs through the food chain.

Journal Article.  4276 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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