Journal Article

Molecular Epidemiology of Pleural and Other Extrapulmonary Tuberculosis: A Maryland State Review

Jessie Torgersen, Susan E. Dorman, Nancy Baruch, Nancy Hooper and Wendy Cronin

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 42, issue 10, pages 1375-1382
Published in print May 2006 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online May 2006 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/503421
Molecular Epidemiology of Pleural and Other Extrapulmonary Tuberculosis: A Maryland State Review

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Background. Limited information exists about the current epidemiological characteristics of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. However, pleural tuberculosis is usually considered to be a manifestation of primary tuberculosis. Our objective was to use molecular epidemiological techniques to describe the occurrence of pleural and other extrapulmonary tuberculosis in Maryland, a state with moderate tuberculosis incidence.

Methods. We surveyed tuberculosis cases reported with a single site of disease in Maryland from 1996 through 2001. Genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates was performed with an IS6110-based restriction fragment—length polymorphism analysis. DNA clustering of strains with >5 IS6110 bands, with supporting epidemiologic information on patients, served as a proxy for recent transmission.

Results. A total of 1811 patients with tuberculosis were reported (incidence, 5.9 cases per 100,000 population). Of 1411 patients (77.9%) with cultures positive for M. tuberculosis, 1246 (88.3%) had a single site of disease, with 934 (75.0%) of these isolates having >5 IS6110 bands. Of the 934 patients included in the analyses, 729 (78.0%) had pulmonary tuberculosis, and 205 (22.0%) had extrapulmonary tuberculosis; of the latter group, 46 patients had pleural disease, and 159 patients had nonrespiratory disease. In multivariate analyses, patients with pleural tuberculosis were not significantly associated with clustered strains, compared with patients with nonrespiratory or pulmonary tuberculosis disease. Having a DNA-clustered strain was negatively associated with nonrespiratory tuberculosis, compared with pulmonary disease (adjusted odds ratio, 0.48; P = .003).

Conclusions. Nonrespiratory extrapulmonary tuberculosis is less likely than pulmonary tuberculosis to be a result of recent infection. Pleural tuberculosis is not an appropriate indicator for recent transmission among our population.

Journal Article.  4080 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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