Journal Article

Use of Efavirenz Is Not Associated with a Higher Risk of Depressive Disorders: A Substudy of the Randomized Clinical Trial ALIZE-ANRS 099

Valérie Journot, Geneviève Chêne, Nathalie De Castro, Corinne Rancinan, Jill-Patrice Cassuto, Christian Allard, Jean-Louis Vildé, Alain Sobel, Michel Garré and Jean-Michel Molina

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 42, issue 12, pages 1790-1799
Published in print June 2006 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online June 2006 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/504323
Use of Efavirenz Is Not Associated with a Higher Risk of Depressive Disorders: A Substudy of the Randomized Clinical Trial ALIZE-ANRS 099

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Background. Efavirenz (EFV) is a highly active antiretroviral drug, use of which is associated with frequent (although transient) neurosensorial adverse reactions. Whether the use of EFV is associated with the risk of depression or suicide remains controversial.

Methods. ALIZE-ANRS (Agence Nationale de Recherches sur le SIDA et les Hépatites Virales) 099 was a 48-week randomized trial involving virologically suppressed, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)—infected patients that compared the maintenance of a treatment regimen that contained protease inhibitors (177 subjects) with a switch to a once-daily combination of EFV, didanosine, and emtricitabine (178 subjects). We used the trial's adverse events reporting system and a self-administered Center for Epidemiologic Studies—Depression Scale questionnaire to assess depressive disorders. Determinants were studied using a multivariate proportional hazards model adjusted for antiretroviral treatment, sex, age, HIV risk factor, history of depression, hepatic disorder, alcohol abuse, and HIV-related or non—HIV-related events.

Results. Thirty cases of depressive disorder (26 cases of depression and 4 suicide attempts) occurred during treatment in 27 patients (12 patients [7%] and 15 patients [8%] in the protease inhibitor—based and EFV-based treatment arms, respectively; P = .56). In the proportional hazards model, only age (hazard ratio, 1.6 per 10 years younger; 95% confidence interval, 1.0–2.6) and a history of depressive disorder (hazard ratio, 5.0; 95% confidence interval, 2.1–12.0) were associated with a risk of depressive disorders. The proportion of depressive patients (24%), as determined on the basis of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies—Depression Scale data, was stable during the follow-up period, without difference between treatment groups. Patients with a history of depressive disorder were more frequently depressed (53%) than were those without such history (22%; P = .03).

Conclusions. The frequency of depressive disorders was high in this population, but the disorders were not related to EFV treatment. Younger age and a history of depression are important determinants for depression and should be considered for early detection and case management.

Journal Article.  4564 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.