Journal Article

Role of US Military Research Programs in the Development of US Food and Drug Administration–Approved Antimalarial Drugs

Lynn W. Kitchen, David W. Vaughn and Donald R. Skillman

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 43, issue 1, pages 67-71
Published in print July 2006 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online July 2006 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/504873
Role of US Military Research Programs in the Development of US Food and Drug Administration–Approved Antimalarial Drugs

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US military physicians and researchers helped identify the optimum treatment dose of the naturally occurring compound quinine and collaborated with the pharmaceutical industry in the development and eventual US Food and Drug Administration approval of the synthetic antimalarial drugs chloroquine, primaquine, chloroquine-primaquine, sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine, mefloquine, doxycycline, halofantrine, and atovaquone-proguanil. Because malaria parasites develop drug resistance, the US military must continue to support the creation and testing of new drugs to prevent and treat malaria until an effective malaria vaccine is developed. New antimalarial drugs also benefit civilians residing in and traveling to malarious areas.

Journal Article.  3933 words. 

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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