Journal Article

Human Bocavirus: Prevalence and Clinical Spectrum at a Children's Hospital

John C. Arnold, Kumud K. Singh, Stephen A. Spector and Mark H. Sawyer

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 43, issue 3, pages 283-288
Published in print August 2006 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online August 2006 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/505399
Human Bocavirus: Prevalence and Clinical Spectrum at a Children's Hospital

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Background. Molecular methods of pathogen discovery have recently led to the description of several new respiratory viruses. Human bocavirus (HBoV), a proposed member of the family Parvoviridae, is one of the most recently described respiratory viruses. Initial reports indicate that HBoV is a common cause of respiratory tract infection in children.

Methods. A total of 1474 nasal scraping specimens collected over a 20-month period were screened by polymerase chain reaction for the presence of HBoV nucleic acid. Positive results were confirmed with a second polymerase chain reaction assay from a different genomic region. The medical records of patients with positive results were reviewed for demographic and clinical data.

Results. HBoV DNA was identified in 82 samples (5.6%). The peak rate of HBoV infection occurred during the period of March through May in both 2004 and 2005. Sixty-three percent of infected patients were <12 months of age. The most common symptoms were cough, rhinorrhea, and fever. Other symptoms of interest included diarrhea and a “paroxysmal” cough that was clinically suspected to be caused by Bordetella pertussis.

Conclusions. HBoV DNA is commonly present in children with upper and lower respiratory tract infections. The presence of a pertussis-like cough and diarrhea in association with HBoV infection merits further investigation.

Journal Article.  3668 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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