Journal Article

John McFadyean and the Centenary of the First Isolation of <i>Campylobacter</i> Species

Martin B. Skirrow

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 43, issue 9, pages 1213-1217
Published in print November 2006 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online November 2006 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/508201
John McFadyean and the Centenary of the First Isolation of Campylobacter Species

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Campylobacter species recently emerged as a leading cause of acute diarrhea in humans, but it is not generally known that these species were first cultured from samples from aborting ewes as far back as 1906. This took place in the United Kingdom during a study that spanned several years of epizootic abortion in cattle and sheep. The chief investigator in this major undertaking was John McFadyean, a little-known yet remarkable man who founded veterinary pathology in Britain and who made immense contributions to public health. A brief portrayal illustrates his uncompromising dedication to scientific accuracy and to his profession, often in the face of opposition.

Journal Article.  3811 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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