Journal Article

Surgical Excision versus Antibiotic Treatment for Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Cervicofacial Lymphadenitis in Children: A Multicenter, Randomized, Controlled Trial

Jerome A. Lindeboom, Ed J. Kuijper, Elisabeth S. Bruijnesteijn van Coppenraet, Robert Lindeboom and Jan M. Prins

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 44, issue 8, pages 1057-1064
Published in print April 2007 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online April 2007 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/512675
Surgical Excision versus Antibiotic Treatment for Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Cervicofacial Lymphadenitis in Children: A Multicenter, Randomized, Controlled Trial

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Background. The optimal treatment of nontuberculosis mycobacterial cervical lymphadenitis in children has not been established. Until recently, surgical excision was the standard treatment, but the number of reports of successful antibiotic treatment is increasing, which questions whether surgery is the preferred treatment. In this randomized, multicenter trial, we compared surgical excision with antibiotic treatment.

Methods. One hundred children with microbiologically proven nontuberculous mycobacterial cervicofacial lymphadenitis were randomly assigned to undergo surgical excision of the involved lymph nodes or to receive antibiotic therapy with clarithromycin and rifabutin for at least 12 weeks. The primary end point was cure, defined as regression of the lymph node enlargement by at least 75%, with cure of the fistula and total skin closure without local recurrence or de novo lesions after 6 months, as assessed by clinical and ultrasound evaluation. Secondary end points included complications of surgery and adverse effects of antibiotic therapy.

Results. Intention-to-treat analysis revealed that surgical excision was more effective than antibiotic therapy (cure rates, 96% and 66%, respectively; 95% confidence interval for the difference, 16%–44%). Treatment failures were explained neither by noncompliance nor by baseline or acquired in vitro resistance to clarithromycin or rifabutin. Surgical complications were seen in 14 (28%) of 50 patients; staphylococcal wound infection occurred in 6 patients, and a permanent grade 2 facial marginal branch dysfunction occurred in 1 patient. The vast majority of patients who were allocated to antibiotic therapy reported adverse effects (39 [78%] of 50 patients), including 4 patients who had to discontinue treatment.

Conclusions. Surgical excision is more effective than antibiotic treatment for children with nontuberculous mycobacterial cervicofacial lymphadenitis.

Journal Article.  4121 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.