Journal Article

Multivariate Analysis of Risk Factors for Infection Due to Penicillin-Resistant and Multidrug-Resistant <i>Streptococcus pneumoniae</i>: A Multicenter Study

Antonio Jesús Clavo-Sánchez, José Antonio Girón-González, Dolores López-Prieto, Jesús Canueto-Quintero, Antonio Sánchez-Porto, Antonio Vergara-Campos, Pilar Marín-Casanova and Juan Antonio Córdoba-Doña

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 24, issue 6, pages 1052-1059
Published in print June 1997 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online June 1997 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/513628
Multivariate Analysis of Risk Factors for Infection Due to Penicillin-Resistant and Multidrug-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae: A Multicenter Study

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Pneumococcal disease was studied prospectively to determine the risk factors associated with resistance to penicillin and other antibiotics. One hundred twelve clinically significant pneumococcal isolates were recovered from 95 patients. Approximately one-half (49.47%) of the cases were due to penicillin-resistant strains. Multivariate analysis showed that previous use of β-lactam antibiotics (odds ratio [OR], 2.81; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.95–8.27), alcoholism (OR, 5.22; 95% CI, 1.43–19.01), and noninvasive disease (OR, 4.53; 95% CI, 1.54–13.34) were associated with penicillin resistance, whereas intravenous drug use (OR, 0.14; 95% CI, 0.03–0.74) was not. Statistical analyses of the variables associated with resistance to multiple antibiotics detected age of younger than 5 years (OR, 16.79; 95% CI, 1.60–176.34) or of 65 years or older (OR, 4.33; 95% CI, 1.42–13.21) and previous use of β-lactam antibiotics by patients with noninvasive disease (OR, 7.92; 95% CI, 1.84–34.06) as parameters associated with increased risk. We conclude that multivariate analysis provides clues for empirical therapy for pneumococcal infection.

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Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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