Journal Article

Clinical Significance of Splenic Tuberculosis in Patients Infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus

Amparo González-López, Fernando Dronda, Mercedes Alonso-Sanz, Fernando Chaves, Ignacio Fernández-Martín and Luis López-Cubero

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 24, issue 6, pages 1248-1251
Published in print June 1997 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online June 1997 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1086/513629
Clinical Significance of Splenic Tuberculosis in Patients Infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus

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To assess the clinical significance of splenic tuberculosis in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1, we compared 20 patients who had splenic tuberculosis with 20 randomly selected, HIV-infected patients with culture-proven tuberculosis for whom splenic involvement had been ruled out by ultrasonography. All of the patients were male prison inmates and intravenous drug users. Statistically significant differences (P < .05) were detected between patients with splenic involvement (median CD4+ cell count, 54/mm3) and those without splenic involvement (median CD4+ cell count, 92/mm3). No specific symptoms suggesting splenic involvement were detected in the patients with splenic tuberculosis. All patients received antituberculous drugs, and none of these patients required splenectomy. The median survival was similar in both groups. Splenic tuberculosis occurs in more-severely immunocompromised HIV-infected patients, the prognosis is generally good, the clinical response to therapy is usually favorable, and splenectomy is rarely necessary.

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Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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