Journal Article

Suggested Modifications to the Duke Criteria for the Clinical Diagnosis of Native Valve and Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis: Analysis of 118 Pathologically Proven Cases

Cristiane C. Lamas and Susannah J. Eykyn

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 25, issue 3, pages 713-719
Published in print September 1997 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online September 1997 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/513765
Suggested Modifications to the Duke Criteria for the Clinical Diagnosis of Native Valve and Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis: Analysis of 118 Pathologically Proven Cases

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

We analyzed 118 consecutive cases of pathologically proven infective endocarditis (100 cases of native valve endocarditis [NVE] and 18 cases of prosthetic valve endocarditis [PVE]) with use of the Beth Israel criteria, the Duke criteria, and our suggested modifications of the Duke criteria; we found improved diagnostic sensitivity with our modifications. These modifications included the following additional minor criteria: the presence of newly diagnosed clubbing, splenomegaly, splinter hemorrhages, and petechiae; a high erythrocyte sedimentation rate; a high C-reactive protein level; and the presence of central nonfeeding lines, peripheral lines, and microscopic hematuria. Analysis of the pathologically proven cases of NVE showed that 64% were probable by the Beth Israel criteria, 83% were definite by the Duke criteria, and 94% were definite by our modified Duke criteria. For the pathologically proven cases of PVE, 50% were probable by the Beth Israel criteria, 50% were definite by the Duke criteria, and 89% were definite by our modified Duke criteria. All cases of NVE and PVE rejected by the Duke criteria remained rejected by our modifications. Therefore, our modifications improved diagnostic sensitivity while retaining specificity.

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.