Journal Article

Effect of Cytomegalovirus Infection on 1-Year Mortality Rates Among Recipients of Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplants

Atul Humar, Serena Wood, Jeff Lipton, Hans Messner, Jacinta Meharchand, Allison McGeer, Kelly MacDonald and Tony Mazzulli

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 26, issue 3, pages 606-610
Published in print March 1998 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online March 1998 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/514569
Effect of Cytomegalovirus Infection on 1-Year Mortality Rates Among Recipients of Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplants

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

The effect of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection on 1-year mortality rates among allogeneic bone marrow transplant recipients who are receiving a standard protocol as prophylaxis for CMV infection is unclear. We determined the risk factors for death within 1 year among 103 bone marrow transplant recipients by performing a multivariate analysis. The results of donor and recipient CMV serologies did not predict 1-year mortality, although there was a trend towards higher mortality among CMVseropositive recipients who received marrow from seronegative donors (P = .077). Multivariate analysis revealed that the factors independently associated with 1-year mortality were the development of CMV antigenemia (relative risk [RR] = 2.74; confidence interval [CI] = 1.28–5.86), bone marrow transplantation (BMT) from unrelated donors (RR = 3.20; CI = 1.30–7.92), and severe acute graft-versus-host disease (RR = 3.50; CI = 1.50–8.17). Although significant on univariate analysis, advanced underlying disease before BMT and the development of active CMV disease after BMT were not independent risk factors. In conclusion, the development of CMV antigenemia after BMT was associated with increased 1-year mortality, while the development of active CMV disease was not. Reactivation of CMV infection may represent a marker of poor immune reconstitution or may contribute to further immunosuppression after BMT.

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.