Journal Article

Detection of <i>Enterocytozoon bieneusi</i> in Two Human Immunodeficiency Virus—Negative Patients with Chronic Diarrhea by Polymerase Chain Reaction in Duodenal Biopsy Specimens and Review

Juan Carlos Gainzarain, Andrés Canut, Matías Lozano, Alicia Labora, Francisco Carreras, Soledad Fenoy, Raquel Navajas, Norman J. Pieniazek, Alexandre J. da Silva and Carmen del Aguila

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 27, issue 2, pages 394-398
Published in print August 1998 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online August 1998 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/514660
Detection of Enterocytozoon bieneusi in Two Human Immunodeficiency Virus—Negative Patients with Chronic Diarrhea by Polymerase Chain Reaction in Duodenal Biopsy Specimens and Review

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Intestinal microsporidiosis has been associated traditionally with severely immunocompromised patients with AIDS. We describe two new cases of intestinal microsporidiosis due to Enterocytozoon bieneusi in human immunodeficiency virus–negative adults. Both patients presented with chronic nonbloody diarrhea, and one had intestinal lymphangiectasia as well. Intestinal microsporidiosis was diagnosed by evaluation of stool samples, and the specific species was determined by use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in duodenal biopsy specimens. To our knowledge, this is the first report of confirmation of E. bieneusi in the intestinal epithelium of HIV-negative individuals by use of PCR in duodenal biopsy specimens. Cases of intestinal microsporidiosis in HIV-negative individuals reported in the English-language literature are reviewed. These two new cases along with those described previously corroborate the need to evaluate for microsporidia in HIV-negative individuals with unexplained diarrhea.

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Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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