Journal Article

Infections Associated with Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators Placed Transvenously and via Thoracotomies: Epidemiology, Infection Control, and Management

Kwan Kew Lai and Sally A. Fontecchio

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 27, issue 2, pages 265-269
Published in print August 1998 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online August 1998 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/514673
Infections Associated with Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators Placed Transvenously and via Thoracotomies: Epidemiology, Infection Control, and Management

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In 1993, the incidence of infection associated with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) excluding generator, lead, and patch placements was 16.7% at our institution. Eighty-eight percent of the ICD implantations were two-staged procedures: the cardiologists performed the electrophysiologic studies in their laboratories, and implantations were performed in the operating rooms a few hours to a few days later by cardiothoracic surgeons. In 1994, both the electrophysiologic studies and ICD implantations were performed in the operating rooms without waiting periods. From 1993 to 1995, the proportion of ICDs placed transvenously increased from 56% to 100%, whereas the proportion of two-staged ICD placements decreased from 88% to zero. From 1992 to 1993 the infection rate decreased concomitantly from 16.7% to zero. From 1992 through 1995, the infection rate for implantable ICDs alone was 4.8%, and the overall infection rate for implantable ICDs (including generator, lead, and patch placements) was 6.9%, comparable to the rate reported in the literature (2.2% to 7.2%). The elimination of the two-stage procedure and the increased proportion of transvenously placed ICDs has contributed to the decrease in infection rate.

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Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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