Journal Article

Safety and Immunogenicity of <i>Haemophilus influenzae</i>-Tetanus Toxoid Conjugate Vaccine Given Separately or in Combination with a Three-Component Acellular Pertussis Vaccine Combined with Diphtheria and Tetanus Toxoids and Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine for the First Four Doses

Scott A. Halperin, James King, Barbara Law, Elaine Mills and Paul Willems

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 28, issue 5, pages 995-1001
Published in print May 1999 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online May 1999 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1086/514741
Safety and Immunogenicity of Haemophilus influenzae-Tetanus Toxoid Conjugate Vaccine Given Separately or in Combination with a Three-Component Acellular Pertussis Vaccine Combined with Diphtheria and Tetanus Toxoids and Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine for the First Four Doses

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

The purpose of this randomized, controlled trial was to assess the safety and immunogenicity of a three-component acellular pertussis vaccine combined with diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and inactivated poliovirus vaccine given either separately or combined as a single injection with a Haemophilus influenzae type b-tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine. A total of 180 infants were immunized at 2, 4, and 6 months of age; 129 were given a booster dose at 16–19 months of age. Vaccineassociated adverse events were similar whether the vaccines were combined as a single injection or given separately. There were no differences in levels of antibodies to Bordetella pertussis antigens (pertussis toxoid, filamentous hemagglutinin, and pertactin), diphtheria toxoid, or the three poliovirus types. The tetanus antitoxin level after the primary three-dose series was higher in recipients of the combined vaccine (2.37 IU/mL) than in recipients of the separate injections (1.32 IU/mL; two-sided P = .0001). In contrast, combined vaccine recipients had lower levels of antibody to H. influenzae type b polysaccharide after the third dose (1.57 µg/mL) than did those given separate injections (3.22 µg/mL; two-sided P = .0026). The antibody levels were not significantly different before or 1 month after the booster dose (32.9 µg/mL vs. 47.8 µg/mL, respectively; two-sided P = .07). We conclude that the vaccines were immunogenic and well tolerated. Despite lower levels of antibody to the H. influenzae type b polysaccharide after the primary three-dose series, mixing of the vaccines in a single syringe likely induced immunologic priming, as suggested by the high antibody levels after the booster dose.

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.