Journal Article

Epidemiological Features of Pertussis in Hospitalized Patients in Canada, 1991- 1997: Report of the Immunization Monitoring Program—Active (IMPACT)

Scott A. Halperin, Elaine E. L. Wang, Barbara Law, Elaine Mills, Rob Morris, Pierre Dery, Marc Lebel, Noni MacDonald, Taj Jadavji, Wendy Vaudry, David Scheifele, Gilles Delage and Philippe Duclos

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 28, issue 6, pages 1238-1243
Published in print June 1999 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online June 1999 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/514792
Epidemiological Features of Pertussis in Hospitalized Patients in Canada, 1991- 1997: Report of the Immunization Monitoring Program—Active (IMPACT)

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To assess the morbidity associated with the continued high levels of pertussis, we studied all children .2 years of age who were admitted to the 11 Immunization Monitoring Program-Active (IMPACT) centers, which constitute 85% of Canada's tertiary care pediatric beds. In the 7 years preceding implementation of acellular pertussis vaccine, a total of 1,082 pertussis cases were reported, of which 49.1% were culture-confirmed. The median age of the patients was 12.4 weeks; 78.9% of cases were in children <6 months of age. Complications of pertussis were common: pneumonia was reported in 9.4% of cases, new seizures in 2.3%, and encephalopathy in 0.5%. There were 10 deaths (0.9%), all in children ⩽6 months of age. Duration of hospitalization was longer (9.3 days vs. 4.9 days; P = .001) and intensive care was required more frequently (19.2% vs. 4.9%; P = .001) in infants under <6 months of age than in those ⩾6 months. Pertussis continues to cause significant morbidity and occasional mortality in Canada, particularly in young infants.

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Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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