Journal Article

Lymphadenitis Due to Nontuberculous Mycobacteria in Children: Presentation and Response to Therapy

Rohan Hazra, Caroline D. Robson, Antonio R. Perez-Atayde and Robert N. Husson

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 28, issue 1, pages 123-129
Published in print January 1999 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online January 1999 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/515091
Lymphadenitis Due to Nontuberculous Mycobacteria in Children: Presentation and Response to Therapy

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The most common manifestation of infection due to nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in children is cervical lymphadenitis in an otherwise healthy patient. We identified and reviewed 19 cases of proven or presumptive lymphadenitis due to NTM seen at our hospital over the course of 13 months. Nine patients underwent initial surgical excision of involved lymph nodes. Ten children did not have involved lymph nodes excised initially and were treated with macrolide-containing antibiotic regimens. Of these patients, five required subsequent surgical excision and five were cured with combination chemotherapy. Six patients underwent radiographic imaging of the head and neck that revealed asymmetrical adenopathy with ring-enhancing masses but minimal inflammatory stranding of the subcutaneous fat, a finding that may distinguish adenitis caused by NTM from staphylococcal and streptococcal adenitis. Our data suggest that if surgical excision is not considered feasible, antimicrobial therapy for adenitis due to NTM may be beneficial for some patients.

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Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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