Journal Article

Cryptosporidium, Enterocytozoon, and Cyclospora Infections in Pediatric and Adult Patients with Diarrhea in Tanzania

J. Peter Cegielski, Ynes R. Ortega, Scott McKee, John F. Madden, Loretta Gaido, David A. Schwartz, Karim Manji, Anders F. Jorgensen, Sara E. Miller, Uma P. Pulipaka, Abel E. Msengi, David H. Mwakyusa, Charles R. Sterling and L. Barth Reller

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 28, issue 2, pages 314-321
Published in print February 1999 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online February 1999 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/515131
Cryptosporidium, Enterocytozoon, and Cyclospora Infections in Pediatric and Adult Patients with Diarrhea in Tanzania

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Cryptosporidiosis, microsporidiosis, and cyclosporiasis were studied in four groups of Tanzanian inpatients: adults with AIDS-associated diarrhea, children with chronic diarrhea (of whom 23 of 59 were positive [+] for human immunodeficiency virus [HIV]), children with acute diarrhea (of whom 15 of 55 were HIV+), and HIV0 control children without diarrhea. Cryptosporidium was identified in specimens from 6/86 adults, 5/59 children with chronic diarrhea (3/5, HIV+), 7/55 children with acute diarrhea (0/7, HIV+), and 0/20 control children. Among children with acute diarrhea, 7/7 with cryptosporidiosis were malnourished, compared with 10/48 without cryptosporidiosis (P < .01). Enterocytozoon was identified in specimens from 3/86 adults, 2/59 children with chronic diarrhea (1 HIV+), 0/55 children with acute diarrhea, and 4/20 control children. All four controls were underweight (P < .01). Cyclospora was identified in specimens from one adult and one child with acute diarrhea (HIV). Thus, Cryptosporidium was the most frequent and Cyclospora the least frequent pathogen identified. Cryptosporidium and Enterocytozoon were associated with malnutrition. Asymptomatic fecal shedding of Enterocytozoon in otherwise healthy, HIV0 children has not been described previously.

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Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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