Journal Article

Consecutive Epidemics of Q Fever in a Residential Facility for Drug Abusers: Impact on Persons with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

Antonio Boschini, Giovanni Di Perri, Delfino Legnani, Paola Fabbri, Paolo Ballarini, Roberta Zucconi, Stefano Boros and Giovanni Rezza

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 28, issue 4, pages 866-872
Published in print April 1999 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online April 1999 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/515192
Consecutive Epidemics of Q Fever in a Residential Facility for Drug Abusers: Impact on Persons with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Two large outbreaks of Q fever occurred in 1987 and 1988 in an agricultural community for the rehabilitation of drug users. Approximately 40% of the residents were human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive. Two hundred thirty-five residents presented with clinical evidence of a flulike syndrome that was confirmed to be Q fever; moreover, a large proportion of residents developed an asymptomatic infection. Clinical signs and symptoms were rather nonspecific: fever, malaise, and muscle pain that were often associated with pulmonary symptoms. Single or multiple opacities were detected, with mild interstitial inflammation evident on chest roentgenograms. The source of infection was the sheepfold, which is part of the stock-farming activity of the community. Both outbreaks occurred just after lambing had begun. Residents who were exposed during the first epidemic were protected in the second one. The attack rate among HIV-positive residents was significantly higher than that among HIV-negative residents in the first outbreak, whereas only a slight, marginally significant difference was observed in the second outbreak. The clinical features of Q fever did not differ between HIV-positive and HIV-negative individuals. No cases of relapse or chronic disease were observed.

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.