Journal Article

<i>Helicobacter pylori</i>: Prevalence, Transmission, and Serum Pepsinogen II Concentrations in Children of a Poor Periurban Community in Bangladesh

S. A. Sarker, D. Mahalanabis, P. Hildebrand, M. M. Rahaman, P. K. Bardhan, G. Fuchs, C. Beglinger and K. Gyr

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 25, issue 5, pages 990-995
Published in print November 1997 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online November 1997 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/516070
Helicobacter pylori: Prevalence, Transmission, and Serum Pepsinogen II Concentrations in Children of a Poor Periurban Community in Bangladesh

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

The aim of this study was to determine the age-specific prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in infants and children aged 1–99 months from a poor periurban community in Bangladesh. We also examined the frequency of infection among infants and their 53 immediate family members and evaluated the relationship between infection and fasting serum group II pepsinogen (pepsinogen II) concentration in 76 children. Sixty-one percent of 1–3 month-old infants tested positive for H. pylori; this rate declined steadily to 33% in children aged 10–15 months and then increased to 84% in children aged 5–8 years. The H. pylori infection rate was 2.5 times higher in children with illiterate mothers. No difference in infection rate was detected among the family contacts of infected vs. noninfected infants. H. pylori-infected children had significantly higher serum pepsinogen II concentrations than did noninfected children (P < .001). We conclude that infection with H. pylori is highly prevalent and occurs at an early age. An environmental factor or factors, rather than or in addition to intrafamilial spread of this infection, are important in poor communities of Bangladesh. The higher levels of serum pepsinogen II in H. pylori-positive children might indicate the presence of gastritis in such asymptomatic children.

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.