Journal Article

Increased Risk of Maternal-Infant Hepatitis C Virus Transmission for Women Coinfected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

Pier-Angelo Tovo, Elvia Palomba, Gabriele Ferraris, Nicola Principi, Ezia Ruga, Paola Dallacasa and Anna Maccabruni

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 25, issue 5, pages 1121-1124
Published in print November 1997 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online November 1997 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/516102
Increased Risk of Maternal-Infant Hepatitis C Virus Transmission for Women Coinfected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

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To estimate the risk of mother-to-child transmission of hepatitis C virus (HCV) and identify correlates of transmission, 245 perinatally exposed singleton children followed prospectively beyond 18 months of age were studied. Overall, 28 (11.4%) of the 245 children acquired HCV infection. Transmission occurred in 3 of 80 children (3.7%) whose mothers had HCV infection alone and in 25 of 165 (15.1%; P < .01) whose mothers had concurrent infection with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). The percentage of HIV-1-infected children was similar (22 of 165, 13.3%), but each virus was transmitted independently; only six infants (3.6%) were coinfected with HCV and HIV-1. The risk of HCV transmission was not associated with maternal HIV-1-related symptoms, intravenous drug use, prematurity, low birth weight, or breast-feeding, whereas it was lower with cesarean section than with vaginal delivery (5.6% vs. 13.9%, P = .06). This suggests that transmission occurs mainly around the time of delivery.

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Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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