Journal Article

Answer to Photo Quiz (See Page 1065)

Cornelius J. Clancy and M. H. Nguyen

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 25, issue 5, pages 1195-1195
Published in print November 1997 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online November 1997 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/516107
Answer to Photo Quiz (See Page 1065)

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

We tested the efficacy of brompheniramine maleate in a large randomized, controlled trial of volunteers with experimental rhinovirus colds. Brompheniramine (12 mg) or placebo was administered at 8:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m. for ⩽4 days after the onset of symptoms (24, 36, or 48 hours after virus challenge). During the first 3 days of treatment (the first 4 days after virus challenge), nasal secretion weights were lower for infected evaluable subjects receiving brompheniramine (n = 113) than for controls (day 1: 4.3 g vs. 6.8 g; day 2: 4.8 g vs. 7.7 g; and day 3: 3.3 g vs. 5.3 g) (P ⩽ .03), as were rhinorrhea scores (day 1: 0.6 vs. 0.8; day 2: 0.5 vs. 0.8; and day 3: 0.3 vs. 0.5) (P < .03), sneeze counts (day 1: 1.8 vs. 3.6; day 2: 2.1 vs. 5.1; and day 3: 1.3 vs. 3.3) (P ⩽ .001), and sneeze severity scores (day 1: 0.3 vs. 0.6; day 2: 0.25 vs. 0.7; and day 3: 0.2 vs. 0.4) (P < .001) (n = 112). Cough counts were lower after day 1 of treatment for the brompheniramine group than for controls (4.7 vs. 7.9) (P = .05) (day 2 after virus challenge), and other symptoms were modestly reduced or were unaffected in the brompheniramine group. Total symptom scores were also lower for the brompheniramine group than for controls on treatment days 1 (4.8 vs. 6.0) (P = .03) and 2 (4.1 vs. 5.6) (days 2 and 3 after virus challenge) (P = .003). Treatment with brompheniramine was associated with the adverse effects of somnolence (n = 3) and confusion (n = 1). Brompheniramine was efficacious treatment for the sneezing, rhinorrhea, and cough associated with rhinovirus colds.

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.