Journal Article

Animal Models of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

Linda G. Byrd and Gregory A. Prince

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 25, issue 6, pages 1363-1368
Published in print December 1997 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online December 1997 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/516152
Animal Models of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Over the past two decades, animal models of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection have been developed using primates, cotton rats, mice, calves, guinea pigs, ferrets, and hamsters. Use of these models has shed light on the mechanisms of vaccine-enhanced disease seen in clinical trials of a formalin-inactivated RSV vaccine and has provided a means for testing efficacy and safety of candidate prophylactic and therapeutic strategies. The development of multiple animal models has coincided with the realization that RSV disease in humans is a multifaceted disease whose clinical manifestations and sequelae depend upon age, genetic makeup, immunologic status, and concurrent disease within subpopulations. There is no single human subpopulation in whom all forms of RSV disease manifest, nor is there a single animal model that duplicates all forms of RSV disease. The choice of an experimental model will be governed by the specific manifestation of disease to be studied.

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.