Journal Article

Role of Immunosuppression in the Evolution of Legionnaires' Disease

M. L. Pedro-Botet, M. Sabria-Leal, N. Sopena, J. M. Manterola, J. Morera, R. Blavia, E. Padilla, L. Matas and J. M. Gimeno

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 26, issue 1, pages 14-19
Published in print January 1998 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online January 1998 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/516258
Role of Immunosuppression in the Evolution of Legionnaires' Disease

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The clinical course of legionella pneumonia in immunosuppressed patients is uncertain. This study was undertaken to determine the clinical evolution of legionellosis on the basis of the immune state and to establish the variables associated with death directly related to legionellosis. The study included 78 patients: 28 with chronic disease who had received immunosuppressive treatment (group 1), 24 with chronic disease without immunosuppressive treatment (group 2), and 26 controls. Inclusion criteria were the occurrence of nosocomially acquired pneumonia, Legionella pneumophila infection, and erythromycin therapy that was initiated within 72 hours following diagnosis. Respiratory and extrarespiratory complications were observed more frequently in groups 1 and 2. Bilateral radiological involvement was most frequent in group 1, and recurrence of legionella pneumonia was observed exclusively in group 1. None of these variables achieved statistical significance. The global mortality of the series was 11.5% (17.9%, 12.5%, and 3.8% in groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively). Variables statistically related to mortality were acute renal failure, shock, and need for mechanical ventilation. Although many of the variables analyzed lacked statistical significance, a trend was seen between complications and basal immunosuppression, as previously suggested.

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Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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