Journal Article

Clinical, Virological, and Histologic Evolution of Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Liver Transplant Recipients

C. Lumbreras, F. Colina, C. Loinaz, Ma. J. Domingo, A. Fuertes, P. Dominguez, R. Gómez, J. M. Aguado, M. Lizasoain, I. González-Pinto, I. Garcia, E. Moreno and A. R. Noriega

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 26, issue 1, pages 48-55
Published in print January 1998 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online January 1998 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/516261
Clinical, Virological, and Histologic Evolution of Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Liver Transplant Recipients

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We designed a prospective study to assess the time course and evolution of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in 152 patients who underwent a liver transplantation (LT) in our institution. Forty-four recipients (29%) were infected by HCV after transplantation: 40 who developed recurrent infection after LT and four who acquired infection during or after LT. No differences were found in survival actuarial rates at 1, 2, and 4 years after transplantation for patients infected by HCV vs. noninfected ones. Graft hepatitis occurred in 66% of HCV-infected recipients: 18 developed chronic active hepatitis (10 of them with intense fibrosis) and 2 developed cirrhosis during the follow-up. Infection by the HCV-1b genotype was found in 79% of the infected recipients and in 100% of those in whom histologic evolution was worst. Fourteen grafts were lost in 44 HCV-infected recipients, in comparison with 12 in 108 HCV-negative patients (P = .007), mostly because of chronic rejection. HCV infection did not affect life expectancy in the midterm follow-up for LT patients. However, it was often associated with the occurrence of early and severe graft hepatitis and with a higher incidence of graft loss due to chronic rejection.

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Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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