Journal Article

Use of Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor in the Treatment of Fungal Infections

John Nemunaitis

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 26, issue 6, pages 1279-1281
Published in print June 1998 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online June 1998 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/516363
Use of Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor in the Treatment of Fungal Infections

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Management of fungal infections is a major medical problem. The risk of developing a fungal infection is higher for patients who are undergoing dose-intensive therapy, are immunocompromised, have neutropenia, are receiving prophylactic antibiotics, have other infections, have invasive catheters, or have a history of severe trauma or burns. Survival is decreased among patients who develop fungal infection in these situations. In view of the high morbidity and mortality associated with fungal infections in transplant recipients, cytokines that enhance cell function, such as macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), have been investigated. M-CSF enhances cytotoxicity, superoxide production, phagocytosis, chemotaxis, and secondary cytokine production in monocytes and macrophages. Animal models and clinical data suggest efficacy of M-CSF in controlling fungal infection.

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Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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