Journal Article

Superinfection with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 2 Can Reactivate Virus Production in Baboons but Is Contained by a CD8 T Cell Antiviral Response

Christopher P. Locher, David J. Blackbourn, Susan W. Barnett, Krishna K. Murthy, Elizabeth K. Cobb, Scott Rouse, Giampaolo Greco, Gustavo Reyes-Terán, Kathleen M. Brasky, Kenneth D. Carey and Jay A. Levy

in The Journal of Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 176, issue 4, pages 948-959
Published in print October 1997 | ISSN: 0022-1899
Published online October 1997 | e-ISSN: 1537-6613 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/516544
Superinfection with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 2 Can Reactivate Virus Production in Baboons but Is Contained by a CD8 T Cell Antiviral Response

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An animal model was used to assess whether resistance to superinfection by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can exist in vivo. Asymptomatic baboons (Papio cynocephalus), previously infected with HIV-2, were first challenged with homologous virus (HIV-2UC2 or HIV-2UC14) and later with heterologous virus (HIV-2UC12). After both virus inoculations, either resistance to viral infection or a transient viremia was observed. The original virus was recovered in 3 baboons, suggesting that reactivation of a latent infection occurred on heterologous challenge and that HIV-2 superinfection is blocked by processes established during prior infection. Antibody titers measured by ELISA and virus neutralization remained at low levels. However, suppression of HIV-1 replication was observed with CD8 T cells and filtered cell culture supernatants. The soluble factor involved was not a β-chemokine. This resistance to HIV superinfection appears to be mediated at least in part by CD8 T cells that suppress virus production.

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Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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