Journal Article

Metabolic Syndrome and Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Patients Infected with HIV

Alexandra Mangili, Denise L. Jacobson, Jul Gerrior, Joseph F. Polak, Sherwood L. Gorbach and Christine A. Wanke

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 44, issue 10, pages 1368-1374
Published in print May 2007 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online May 2007 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/516616
Metabolic Syndrome and Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Patients Infected with HIV

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Background.The present study examines the association between carotid and coronary atherosclerosis and metabolic syndrome in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected adults.

Methods.We measured the common and internal carotid intima-media thickness (c-IMT) using B-mode ultrasonography, and we measured coronary artery calcium (CAC) using high-resolution, electrocardiographic, synchronized, computed tomography, for 314 HIV-infected men and women. Metabolic syndrome was defined by National Cholesterol Education Program/Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. We compared the c-IMT measurements and CAC scores of patients with metabolic syndrome with the scores of those without metabolic syndrome using a Wilcoxon test for continuous variables and a χ2 test for categorical variables. To examine the association between surrogate markers and metabolic syndrome, we used logistic regression analysis.

Results.Participants with metabolic syndrome were more likely to have a common c-IMT measurement >0.8 mm than were those without metabolic syndrome (17% vs.7%; P = .009), but both groups were equally likely to have an internal c-IMT measurement >1.0 mm (20% vs. 13%; P = .15). Any positive CAC score was more likely to occur for participants with metabolic syndrome (80.3% vs. 46.7%; P < .0001). In a multivariate model adjusted for sex, age, ethnicity, and smoking status, participants with metabolic syndrome were more likely than those without metabolic syndrome to have an abnormal common c-IMT measurement (odds ratio [OR], 2.9; P = .020) and detectable CAC scores (OR, 4.9; P < .0001) but not a higher internal c-IMT measurement (OR, 1.6; P = .255).

Conclusion.Our study demonstrates that HIV-infected individuals with metabolic syndrome may be at increased risk for subclinical atherosclerosis and supports screening for metabolic syndrome among HIV-infected patients at risk for cardiovascular disease.

Journal Article.  4226 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.