Journal Article

Ischemic Heart Disease in HIV-Infected and HIV-Uninfected Individuals: A Population-Based Cohort Study

Niels Obel, Henrik F. Thomsen, Gitte Kronborg, Carsten S. Larsen, Per R. Hildebrandt, Henrik T. Sørensen and Jan Gerstoft

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 44, issue 12, pages 1625-1631
Published in print June 2007 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online June 2007 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/518285
Ischemic Heart Disease in HIV-Infected and HIV-Uninfected Individuals: A Population-Based Cohort Study

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Background. There are concerns about highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) causing a progressive increase in the risk of ischemic heart disease. We examined this issue in a nationwide cohort study of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and a population-based control group.

Methods. We determined the rate of first hospitalization for ischemic heart disease in all Danish patients with HIV infection (3953 patients) from 1 January 1995 through 31 December 2004 and compared this rate with that for 373,856 subjects in a population-based control group. Data on first hospitalization for ischemic heart disease and comorbidity were obtained from the Danish National Hospital Registry for all study participants. We used Cox's regression to compute the hospitalization rate ratio as an estimate of relative risk, adjusting for comorbidity.

Results. Although the difference was not statistically significant, patients with HIV infection who had not initiated HAART were slightly more likely to be hospitalized for the first time with ischemic heart disease than were control subjects (adjusted relative risk, 1.39; 95% confidence interval, 0.81–2.33). After HAART initiation, the risk increase became substantially higher (adjusted relative risk, 2.12; 95% confidence interval, 1.62–2.76), but the relative risk did not further increase in the initial 8 years of HAART.

Conclusions. Compared with the general population, HIV-infected patients receiving HAART have an increased risk of ischemic heart disease, but the relative risk is stable up to 8 years after treatment initiation.

Journal Article.  3939 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.