Journal Article

Association of the Outcome of Renal Transplantation with Antibody Response to Cytomegalovirus Strain—Specific Glycoprotein H Epitopes

Kei Ishibashi, Tadahiko Tokumoto, Kazunari Tanabe, Hiroki Shirakawa, Koichi Hashimoto, Nobuhiro Kushida, Tomohiko Yanagida, Naoki Inoue, Osamu Yamaguchi, Hiroshi Toma and Tatsuo Suzutani

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 45, issue 1, pages 60-67
Published in print July 2007 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online July 2007 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/518571
Association of the Outcome of Renal Transplantation with Antibody Response to Cytomegalovirus Strain—Specific Glycoprotein H Epitopes

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Background. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the most important pathogen affecting the outcome of renal transplantation. The combination of CMV-seronegative transplant recipients with CMV-seropositive transplant donors places recipients at the highest risk of CMV disease. In cases of congenital CMV infection, existing immunity only partially protected mothers from reinfection with a different genotypic strain. The effect of differences in infected CMV strains between CMV-seropositive transplant donors and CMV seropositive transplant recipients on the outcome of transplantation remains unclear.

Methods. In this prospective multicenter study, the presence of antibodies against strain-specific glycoprotein H epitopes in 84 CMV-seropositive transplant donor/CMV-seropositive transplant recipient renal transplantation cases were determined, and their relationships to acute transplant rejection, CMV infection, degree of antigenemia, and CMV disease were evaluated.

Results. Among the 84 donor/recipient pairs, 45 and 32 had matched and mismatched strain-specific glycoprotein H antibodies, respectively. Acute transplant rejection in the mismatched group was more frequent than it was in the matched group (63% vs. 22%; P = .005). CMV disease was also more frequently observed in the mismatched group (28% vs. 9%; P = .026). The mismatched group had a higher level of antigenemia (P = .019).

Conclusions. Our results illustrate more adverse events in the cases with a CMV-seropositive transplant donor and a CMV-seropositive transplant recipient in which the glycoprotein H antibodies are mismatched, suggesting that reinfection with a different CMV strain results in more complications.

Journal Article.  4525 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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