Journal Article

Failure to Establish HIV Care: Characterizing the "No Show" Phenomenon

Michael J. Mugavero, Hui-Yi Lin, Jeroan J. Allison, James H. Willig, Pei-Wen Chang, Malcolm Marler, James L. Raper, Joseph E. Schumacher, Maria Pisu and Michael S. Saag

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 45, issue 1, pages 127-130
Published in print July 2007 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online July 2007 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/518587
Failure to Establish HIV Care: Characterizing the "No Show" Phenomenon

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It is estimated that up to one-third of persons with known human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in the United States are not engaged in care. We evaluated factors associated with patients' failure to establish outpatient HIV care at our clinic and found that females, racial minorities, and patients lacking private health insurance were more likely to be "no shows." At the clinic level, longer waiting time from the call to schedule a new patient visit to the appointment date was associated with failure to establish care. Because increased numbers of patients will be in need of outpatient HIV care as a result of recent Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines advocating routine HIV testing, it is imperative that strategies to improve access are developed to overcome the "no show" phenomenon.

Journal Article.  2161 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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