Journal Article

Reservoirs of Antimicrobial Resistance in Pet Animals

David H. Lloyd

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 45, issue Supplement_2, pages S148-S152
Published in print September 2007 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online September 2007 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/519254
Reservoirs of Antimicrobial Resistance in Pet Animals

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Increasing amounts of antimicrobials are used in pets, including substances used in human medicine (in particular, broad-spectrum agents such as clavulante-potentiated aminopenicillins, cephalosporins, and fluoroquinolones). There is evidence that resistance to antimicrobials is growing among bacteria causing infection in pets. These bacteria include Staphylococcus intermedius and Escherichia coli, as well as other organisms of clinical importance in humans, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Transmission of such organisms, particularly pathogenic staphylococci, occurs between pets, owners, and veterinary staff, and pets can act as reservoirs of such bacteria; this may have an impact on the use of antimicrobials in human medicine. There is a need to generate data regarding both the levels of carriage of such bacteria in pets and the risk factors associated with the transfer of the bacteria to humans who have contact with infected pets, as well as to improve hygiene measures in veterinary practice.

Journal Article.  3487 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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