Journal Article

Staging of the Baboon Response to Group A Streptococci Administered Intramuscularly: A Descriptive Study of the Clinical Symptoms and Clinical Chemical Response Patterns

Fletcher B. Taylor, Amy E. Bryant, Kenneth E. Blick, Eric Hack, Patty M. Jansen, Stanley D. Kosanke and Dennis L. Stevens

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 29, issue 1, pages 167-177
Published in print July 1999 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online July 1999 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/520147
Staging of the Baboon Response to Group A Streptococci Administered Intramuscularly: A Descriptive Study of the Clinical Symptoms and Clinical Chemical Response Patterns

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Group A streptococcal infections, ranging from necrotizing fasciitis and myositis to toxic shock syndrome, have increased over the last 10 years. We developed the first primate model of necrotizing fasciitis and myositis. Thirteen baboons were inoculated intramuscularly with group A streptococci (GAS). Eleven animals survived for ⩾11 days before sacrifice, and two animals died within 2 days. The site of inoculation of the survivors exhibited an intense neutrophilic influx (stage I), followed by a lymphoplasmacytic influx (stages II and III). This was accompanied by the appearance of markers of an acute and then a chronic systemic inflammatory response. In contrast, the site of inoculation of the two nonsurvivors exhibited intravascular aggregates of neutrophils at its margin with no influx of neutrophils and with extensive bacterial colonization. We conclude that GAS inoculation induces a local and systemic acute neutrophilia followed by a chronic lymphoplasmacytic response; failure, initially, of neutrophilic influx into the site of inoculation predisposes to systemic GAS sepsis and death; and this three-stage primate model approximates the human disease.

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.